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'01 Cadillac 4T80E TCC solenoid

 
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gkon gkon
New User | Posts: 9 | Joined: 07/07
Posted: 07/25/07
12:17 PM

I've got an '01 SDV with a DTC "TCC stuck off". Thorough checking tells me the TCC solenoid needs replacing (internal solenoid resistance is 3.5 ohms with no short to ground and is supposed to be 10 - 15 ohms). The rest of the circuit checks out ok. Can anyone tell me if there is any short cut besides removing the entire eng/trans assy? I was hoping maybe I could jack up under the trans and disconnect engine mounts, exhaust piping and whatever else was in the way and lowering the assembly slightly and maybe tilting it to get access to the side cover to replace that solenoid. Also, if I must remove the unit, is it be easier to just remove the transmission or should the eng/trans be removed as an assembly? Thanks in advance for any advice.  

Trannyprentice Trannyprentice
New User | Posts: 15 | Joined: 02/07
Posted: 07/25/07
02:28 PM

Yes you can get the side cover off without removing the trans, I have done it several times to replace the turbine sensor. It is still time consuming and would be difficult to do without a hoist as you have to chain up the motor and undo the frame bolts completely from the driver side and loosen the ones on the passenger side quite a bit.  

gkon gkon
New User | Posts: 9 | Joined: 07/07
Posted: 07/25/07
07:38 PM

You've made my day with that response! I'll have the car on a lift tomorrow A.M. so I can see better what you're referring to by the "frame bolts". I'll let you know if there's a problem and, if none, then I'll let you know how the job went. Thanks,  George K.  

gkon gkon
New User | Posts: 9 | Joined: 07/07
Posted: 07/26/07
04:03 PM

Well, I got the car on a lift this A.M. and couldn't believe the magnitude of work required to lower the eng/trans assy to get at the side cover. I was thumbing through the phone book, about to turn it over to a shop when I decided to take another look ($1,000 isn't chicken feed!). I removed the air cleaner assy, computer and plastic housing and moved all electrical harnesses aside. It looked as though I had enough room to pop the side cover enough to access the TCC solenoid. I jacked up the car just enough to get the left wheel off, undid the left engine mount(after supporting the left side of the trans with a small jack) and then undid the nine bolts holding the side cover in place. After putting a drip pan on the ground below the cover, I popped it loose, drained the nearly 2 quarts of fluid and had perfect access to the TCC solenoid. There was only one tight squeeze in removing the stud through the upper arm of that left engine/trans mount. I had a friend pry the eng/trans assy slightly to the right(away from the left frame) in order to remove that stud and engine mount. The entire disassembly took less than 2 hours. The TCC solenoid was totally fried. I pick up the new solenoid tomorrow and don't anticipate any problems in reassembly. It turned out to be a shade tree job that just about anyone can do with a few basic tools. Any questions, you can contact me at "geokonow@att.net"  

gkon gkon
New User | Posts: 9 | Joined: 07/07
Posted: 07/29/07
03:33 PM

There is one caveat to this job - the retainer clip for this solenoid is located on the side facing the cover and almost impossible to see without a mirror.I extracted it using a dental pick and let fall to the bottom of the pan where it was easy to retrieve. Replacing it after installing the new solenoid was a bit more fun. I tied a piece of sewing thread to the retainer so that when I dropped it, it would be easier to retrieve.I fashioned a tool using an alligator clip with about 8 inches of the old heavy wire solder jammed into the collar of the clip(maybe a coathanger wire would do as well) and then, after grabbing the retainer with the alligator clip, bent the solder to the correct angles in order to slip the retainer into the casting slot. Once in the slot, you must seat the retainer by sliding a long screw driver down inside the pan directly behind the retainer and then prying(camming) the screwdriver gently against the cover to seat the retainer. You can check the installation by feeling the back of the retainer with your finger and trying to extract the solenoid - you should feel it stop when it hits the retainer. Remove the alligator clip, cut the string and you're finished. It helped to have a buddy hold a flashlight to light up the inside of the transmission case because you can just see the edge of the retainer while you're doing the positioning. This is all accomplished by leaning over the left fender.  George K.  

gkon gkon
New User | Posts: 9 | Joined: 07/07
Posted: 10/15/07
04:50 PM

Follow up:  1) Not necessary to jack up under trans to remove left engine mount.  2) I cut 1/4 inch off the end of the stud/bolt for the left engine mount to avoid having to pry the engine assy away from the frame again. There was plenty of thread left to secure the engine mount attaching nut.
3) Make certain the parting surface o-ring is seated in the groove and there's no dirt on the surface. I re-used the o-ring and there's no sign of weeping. 4) I purchased a pack of two 10 ohm, 10 watt resistors from Radio Shack, placed them in parallel, twisted the leads together and soldered, ending with a 5 ohm resistance. I then cut the TCC ground lead where it travels through the air cleaner compartment and soldered the resistor assembly in series with that wire. I did this because when I bought the new solenoid, the parts counter man said "we sell a lot of these". The resistor effectively reduces the current through the TCC by about 1/3, hopefully prolonging its life.  5) It's been over 2 1/2 months and a few thousand miles since I did the job and the transmission has been performing flawlessly.  George K.  

gkon gkon
New User | Posts: 9 | Joined: 07/07
Posted: 04/05/12
05:37 AM

Follow up: It's been nearly 5 years and 40,000+ miles and it's still working like a charm (I hope I'll not be sorry for saying that!). Instead of using sewing thread to hold the retainer clip, I now recommend dental floss, since one fellow trying the procedure dropped the clip and promptly broke the thread while retrieving the clip. I also highly recommend installing the resistance unit to keep the solenoid running cooler. that's an easy one to accomplish at any time! My new e-mail address is: geokonow@gmail.com.      George K.  

773fixitman 773fixitman
New User | Posts: 1 | Joined: 04/12
Posted: 04/09/12
03:00 PM

i have a 2001 cadillac deville that needs tcc replacement ,im willing to do the job if im sure i can do it as you said you did but skipping the resistor part.in need of a confidence booster.  

walterwhite24 walterwhite24
New User | Posts: 4 | Joined: 04/12
Posted: 04/16/12
07:38 PM

Glad to see everything is working after all these years Wink  
walterwhite24
walterwhite24

gkon gkon
New User | Posts: 9 | Joined: 07/07
Posted: 05/18/12
08:59 AM

Just saw your post.  Anyone with basic mechanical skills and a willingness to get their hands dirty can accomplish this task in a day (in the shade of a tree). It helps to have some appropriate tools and possibly a mechanically inclined friend to offer assistance and moral support. I highly recommend you consider installing the resistors since I feel they greatly enhance the life of the solenoid - you really don't want to have to do this job more than once on any vehicle!    George K.  

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