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RWD Vs. FWD vs AWD

 
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MKIV MKIV
Enthusiast | Posts: 404 | Joined: 04/06
Posted: 07/25/06
09:47 AM

My friends and i always discuss about the advantages and disadvantages of having one drivetrain over the other.  We've come to hundreds of different conclusions but i always like to hear other peoples opinions.

How does FWD benefit over RWD?
How does AWD benefit over RWD?
and so on and so on....

Tell me your opinions.
(Strictly speaking of performance/handling)  

aquabat911 aquabat911
Enthusiast | Posts: 708 | Joined: 04/06
Posted: 07/25/06
10:14 AM

Well its pretty basic, your car has a finite amount of total grip. You need to use that grip for cornering and braking or accelerating. You can transfer more grip from one tire to another with weight transfer.  

FWD over RWD: from a performance stnad point there isn't really an advantage to FWD, maybe on snow but still arguable. you only have so much grip and with front wheel drive you are asking the front tires to do everything, turn and accelerate. Plus when you accelerate you get weight transfer towards the rear so you are taking even more weight off the front wheels compounding the problem. The advatage of front wheel drive in real world sense is that it is compact and cheap to produce. FWD is the easist and most forgiving to drive.

AWD over RWD: The benefit is that you can put power done with all four tires(obviously) you are splitting the work so it allows you to get more power down without over powering your grip. AWD In the past has had a tnedency to understeer, but with recent rear biased systems that is starting to change.

Rwd drive allows you to slide the rear end with throttle to tighten up you line. Most drivers feel they have the most control over a RWD car, but when you start getting into high HP cars you need to start thinking AWD.  

ssali ssali
User | Posts: 219 | Joined: 06/06
Posted: 07/25/06
10:45 AM

Depending on where I lived and what the climate is I would want:

AWD - harsh winters, wet/icy/snow roads.

RWD - everything else!!!  

MKIV MKIV
Enthusiast | Posts: 404 | Joined: 04/06
Posted: 07/25/06
10:47 AM

ive had both an RWD and currently a FWD...and id have to agree with the whole control issue between the different types...but ive seen in many occasions (for example) where FWD cars out handle AWD and RWD in the twisties when all my life i thought that RWD and AWD vehicles were better as far as the track goes.  

aquabat911 aquabat911
Enthusiast | Posts: 708 | Joined: 04/06
Posted: 07/26/06
02:22 AM

Icon QuoteMKIV:
ive had both an RWD and currently a FWD...and id have to agree with the whole control issue between the different types...but ive seen in many occasions (for example) where FWD cars out handle AWD and RWD in the twisties when all my life i thought that RWD and AWD vehicles were better as far as the track goes.

are you really comparing apples to apples when you say you have seen FWD cars outhandle RWD and AWD cars, or are we talking about seeing a FWD car with a really well set-up modified suspension outhandle a stock mustang? With all things being equal a RWD or AWD drive will ALWAYS outhandle the FWD. You are trying to put down power and steer at the same time with FWD, you are barely utilizing your rear tires at all, so you are basicaly wasting that grip. The MINI Cooper S is one of the best handling FWD cars ever built. A comparable RWD car size/hp/set-up/weight would probably be a Miata, a Miata will outhandle the MINI on any track. There are some really good handling FWD cars out there, but basic physics is just too much to overcome.  

MKIV MKIV
Enthusiast | Posts: 404 | Joined: 04/06
Posted: 07/26/06
03:12 AM

*** time to sell the car then Frown

4 more years...and ill give a big hello to a Honda S2000 hehe  

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